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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

  

This is an archived document. The links are no longer being updated.

TB Notes 1, 2004

UPDATE FROM THE CLINICAL AND HEALTH SYSTEMS RESEARCH BRANCH

New Web Site for Clinicians Treating TB and HIV

In a “Notice to Readers” published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report dated  January 23, 2004 (MMWR 2004; 53[2]: 37), the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the launch of a new Web site for clinicians treating tuberculosis (TB) disease in patients taking certain antiretroviral drugs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This site, entitled Updated Guidelines for the Use of Rifamycins for the Treatment of Tuberculosis Among HIV-Infected Patients Taking Protease Inhibitors or Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors and available at  www.cdc.gov/nchstp/tb/TB_HIV_Drugs/TOC.htm, was produced by CDC scientists and a group of outside experts to provide clinicians with the latest dosing guidelines for this complex and rapidly-evolving field. 

The data on this Web site supercede the information contained in previously published guidelines (“Notice to Readers: Updated Guidelines for the Use of Rifabutin or Rifampin for the Treatment and Prevention of Tuberculosis Among HIV-Infected Patients Taking Protease Inhibitors.” MMWR 2000; 49 [9]: 185-89). In addition to the information on antiretroviral drugs reviewed in the previous guidelines, the update contains suggested dosing for the following:

  • lopinavir/ritonavir
  • atazanavir
  • fosamprenavir

Because of the need to frequently update these guidelines, future recommendations will be made accordingly and be available at the aforementioned Internet link.

We hope that this Web site will enhance clinicians’ efforts to effectively manage patients with HIV infection and TB disease, and thereby optimize efforts to eliminate TB.

—Reported by Philip R. Spradling, MD
Div of TB Elimination

 


Released October 2008
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention
Division of Tuberculosis Elimination - http://www.cdc.gov/tb

Please send comments/suggestions/requests to: hsttbwebteam@cdc.gov, or to
CDC/Division of Tuberculosis Elimination
Communications, Education, and Behavioral Studies Branch
1600 Clifton Rd., NE - Mailstop E-10, Atlanta, GA 30333